Impact of cardiovascular risk factors on healthy lifespan and mortality in Brazil and Mexico

Impact of cardiovascular risk factors on healthy lifespan and mortality in Brazil and Mexico

15 - 16 Oct 2013

Location: Cambridge, MA, United States; organised by the Harvard School of Public Health, Swiss Re and swissnex Boston

About the event

Swiss Re, one of the world’s largest re/insurers, in collaboration with the Harvard School of Public Health and swissnex Boston, cordially invites you to this interactive two-day conference, to be held at the Norton's Woods Conference Center at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Cardiovascular disease and stroke have become the number one causes of death in the strategically important markets of Brazil and Mexico. But what do we know behind these headline figures? What efforts are being made to improve cardiovascular mortality outcomes and how can public health contribute? What factors are inhibiting the development of healthier hearts? How will these questions affect overall mortality in the two countries?

The conference complements a joint research collaboration currently being undertaken by Swiss Re and the Harvard School of Public Health. The study is entitled Systematic Explanatory Analyses of Risk Factors affecting Cardiovascular Health (SEARCH). The findings of the study will explore the potential for better health outcomes, and how current heart disease trends might affect future mortality.

Target audience

Participants will include public health experts, academics, insurers and leading experts in fields spanning epidemiology, the aging process, and cutting edge advances in the prevention, detection and treatment of disease.

Note: This event may be photographed, live webstreamed and /or recorded. A summary of the event, pictures and/or a video of the event in which you may appear may be posted and made available on Swiss Re’s and swissnex Boston's internal and external websites and in printed materials.

Day 1: videos and pdfs

Tuesday, 15 October 2013

12:00pm

Buffet lunch

1:00pm

Welcome, introduction and presentation of Marshal's greetings from Harvard
Julio Frenk, Dean, Harvard School of Public Health

1:20pm

The Swiss Re perspective
Eric Smith, CEO, Swiss Re Americas

1:40pm

Our focus: Cardiovascular disease
Michelle Williams, Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health; Chair, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

2:10pm

Longevity research - a collaborative approach
Christoph Nabholz, Head Business Development, Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue

2:40pm

Our strategy: Projections in rapidly changing countries
Joseph Brain, Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health

3:00pm

Coffee break

3:30pm

Overview of health in Mexico: Past, present and future
Martin Lajous, Research Professor, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico; Research Fellow in Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

3:50pm

Overview of health in Brazil: Past, present and future
Marcia Castro, Associate Professor of Demography, Harvard School of Public Health

4:10pm

A Latin American insurance perspective
Eduardo Lara, Senior Health Insurance Actuary Latin America, Swiss Re

4:30pm

Workshops on Mexico and Brazil featuring postdocs, HSPH mentors and Swiss Re collaborators

Determinants of cardiovascular health in Mexico
Moderator: Subu Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard School of Public Health


The use of public US data sources for insurance mortality research
Moderator: Kenneth Krause, Medical Director, Underwriting Medical R&D, Swiss Re


Determinants of cardiovascular health in Brazil

Moderator: Nancy Long Sieber, Adjunct Lecturer on Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health

Cardiovascular risk factors: Implications for the insurance industry in Mexico
Moderator: Monica Wilson, Medical Director, Swiss Re

5:30pm

Networking reception and poster exhibition

6:30pm

Celebratory dinner for speakers, organizers and selected guests
Harvard Choral Group: The Pitches
Celebratory toasts in honor of our anniversaries
Harvard School of Public Health: David Hunter
Swiss Re: Dan Ryan
Remarks: Bernard Lown, Professor Emeritus, Nobel Laureate

Day 2: videos and pdfs

Wednesday, 16 October 2013

7:30am

Continental breakfast

8:30am

Smoking
Greg Connolly, Professor of the Practice of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health

8:50am

Diet and metabolism
Carlos O. Mendivil, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University de Los Andes

9:15am

Indoor and outdoor air pollution
Doug Dockery, Professor of Environmental Epidemiology; Chair, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health

9:35am

Time trends in physical activity levels in Brazil
I-Min Lee, Professor in the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

10:00am

Coffee break

10:30am

Health systems: Addressing overtreatment and undertreatment in achieving global goals of universal access
Shannon Brownlee, Senior Vice President, Lown Institute

10:50am

Synergies with the WHO and with ministers of health
Thomas Zeltner, Special Envoy of the Director-General for financing of WHO, World Health Organization

11:10am

The future of disease-based models of longevity
Daniel Ryan, Head Life & Health R&D, Swiss Re

11:30am

Panel discussion
Carlos Mendivil Anaya, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University de Los Andes
Frank Hu, Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health
Stephen Kramer, Head of Epidemiological Research, Life & Health R&D, Swiss Re

12:15pm

Concluding remarks
Joseph Brain, Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health
Daniel Ryan, Head Life & Health R&D, Swiss Re

12:30pm

Boxed lunch

Speakers

Joe Brain

Joseph Brain

Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health


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Shannon Brownlee

Shannon Brownlee

Senior Vice President, The Lown Institute


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Marcia Castro

Marcia Castro

Associate Professor of Demography, Harvard School of Public Health


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Greg Connolly

Gregory Connolly

Professor of the Practice of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health


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Doug Dockery

Douglas Dockery

Professor of Environmental Epidemiology; Chair, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health


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Julio Frenk

Julio Frenk

Dean of the Faculty, Harvard School of Public Health


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Frank Hu

Frank Hu

Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health; Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School


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Stephen Kramer

Head of Epidemiological Research, Life & Health R&D, Swiss Re


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Ken Krause

Kenneth Krause

Medical Director, Underwriting Medical R&D, Swiss Re


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Martin Lajous

Martin Lajous

Research Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health; Researcher, National Institute of Public Health of Mexico


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Eduardo Lara

Eduardo Lara

Senior Health Insurance Actuary Latin America, Swiss Re


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I-Min Lee

I-Min Lee

Professor in the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School


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Nancy Long-Sieber

Nancy Long-Sieber

Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health


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Christoph Nabholz

Christoph Nabholz

Head Business Development, Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue


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Daniel Ryan

Head of Population Risk & Data Analytics R&D, Swiss Re UK


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Eric Smith

Eric Smith

Chief Executive Officer Swiss Re Americas; Regional President Americas; Member of the Group Executive Committee


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SV Subramanian

Subu Subramanian

Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard School of Public Health


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Michelle Williams

Michelle Williams

Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health


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Monica Wilson

Monica Wilson

Medical Director, Swiss Re


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Thomas Zeltner

Thomas Zeltner

Special Envoy for Financing, World Health Organization


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Partners

HSPH logo


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Summary

Symposium explores trends in cardiovascular disease in Brazil, Mexico

The rise of cardiovascular disease in two rising powers—Mexico and Brazil—was the focus of a two-day symposium between Swiss Re and the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), held from 15 to 16 October at the Norton’s Woods Conference Center at the Academy of Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Both institutions also commemorated landmark birthdays at the event, as 2013 marks the 150-year anniversary of Swiss Re and the 100-year anniversary of HSPH.

The symposium, titled “The impact of cardiovascular risk factors on healthy lifespan and mortality in Brazil and Mexico,” explored the reasons behind the global rise in non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, now the leading cause of death worldwide. Speakers described the epidemiological transitions occurring in these two emerging countries and addressed the roles of key risk factors, including smoking, diet and metabolism, indoor and outdoor air pollution, and physical activity levels.

“The Harvard collaboration offers the opportunity to hold more intense dialogue around risk factors in key countries around the world that hold the answer to not only longer lives, but longer, healthier lives,” said Eric Smith, CEO of Swiss Re Americas.

The conference in Cambridge—along with a similar one focused on China and India to be held from 10 to 12 November in Zurich, Switzerland—are part of a joint research collaboration between Swiss Re and HSPH entitled Systematic Explanatory Analyses of Risk Factors affecting Cardiovascular Health (SEARCH). Supported by the World Health Organization, the study aims to quantify health cardiovascular disease risk factors and their impact on mortality and longevity in rapidly developing countries.

Reductions in smoking prevalence and better control of blood pressure and lipid management have the potential for significant increases in life expectancy. But in developed and emerging countries, there is great uncertainty as to the magnitude of further improvements, as more targeted use of new and existing treatments is offset by the impact of increasing obesity, said Smith.

Conference report: Impact of cardiovascular risk factors on healthy lifespan and mortality in Brazil and Mexico

Conference report

Impact of cardiovascular risk factors on healthy lifespan and mortality in Brazil and Mexico

A collaboration on risk factors and health outcomes

Global Population Ageing: Peril or Promise?

Daniel Ryan, Swiss Re's L&H R&D Head contributed to this report through an article on modern medical education (chapter 15)

RDS Longevity

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