Risk and opportunity in the archipelago world

06 Jan 2012

Ten years after the attacks of September 11th, the brief moment of global solidarity that followed when we were “all Americans," in the words of Le Monde, seems as improbable as it is distant. Barring a global catastrophe, the world is unlikely to unite again as it did on that day –and not just because of the conduct and course of the wars of 9/11 in Afghanistan and Iraq. A deeper –and more radical –shift is at work in the politics of the global economy. A fragmentation of power, capital and ideas is creating a new map of the world –with lasting implications for investors and policymakers alike.

The evidence is everywhere. Europe beginning to roll back key aspects of the free market even as it manages yet another bail-out of Greece; the failure of the Copenhagen climate change negotiations; a Doha trade round dead in all but name; the emergence of new global governance structures, such as G-20; the flows of macro-finance investments between emerging markets combining state and business interests; China’s “going out" strategy upending traditional vectors of global capital and influence; an Arab awakening as much defined by its diversity as its aspiration for accountability and legitimate government; the resurgence of nationalist, populist movements across rich and poor parts of the world; a proliferation of hybrid economic and political systems defying old categories of left and right, liberal and authoritarian.

Read the full article, written by Nader Mousavizadeh.